#iamjudgingyou -.-

Does the Bible Tell Christians to Judge Not?

by Ken Ham, Jeremy Ham, David Chakranarayan, and Steve Golden on April 26, 2013

Many people conclude that making judgments on anyone (especially coming from Christians) is wrong because the Bible says ”judge not” (Matthew 7:1).

We live in a world that increasingly strives to (supposedly) promote the idea of tolerance, but actually becomes intolerant of Christian absolutes as it does so. Whether it involves religion, behavior, or human sexuality, there is a growing anti-Christian sentiment in America and other Western nations. Ultimately, built into this “tolerance” is the concept that truth is determined by each individual, not by God. This has led many people to conclude that making judgments on anyone (especially coming from Christians) is wrong because the Bible says ”judge not” (Matthew 7:1). Interestingly enough, those who reject the notion of God or the credibility of the Bible often attempt to use God’s Word (e.g., by quoting verses out of context) to excuse their actions when they are presented with the gospel and the plight of sinners for rejecting it.

The Authority on Judging

Scripture makes it very clear that there is one supreme Judge of all—the Lord God—and that He alone has the authority to determine right and wrong motives and behaviors.

Many Old Testament passages attest to the truth of God as Judge:

God is a just judge, and God is angry with the wicked every day. (Psalm 7:11)

He shall judge the world in righteousness, and he shall administer judgments for the people in uprightness. (Psalm 9:8)

Let the heavens declare His righteousness, for God himself is Judge. Selah (Psalm 50:6)

For the Lord is our Judge, the Lord is our Lawgiver, the Lord is our King; He will save us. (Isaiah 33:22)

The Old Testament is rife with passages that establish God as the ultimate Judge. When we come to the New Testament, we find that the Father has committed authority and judgment to the Son. Jesus spoke of this authority before He ascended to heaven after the Resurrection (Matthew 28:18).

“For the Father judges no one, but has committed all judgment to the Son.” (John 5:22)

“I have come as a light into the world, that whoever believes in Me should not abide in darkness. And if anyone hears My words and does not believe, I do not judge him; for I did not come to judge the world but to save the world. He who rejects Me, and does not receive My words, has that which judges him—the word that I have spoken will judge him in the last day.”(John 12:46–48)

Because He has appointed a day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by the Man whom He has ordained. He has given assurance of this to all by raising Him from the dead. (Acts 17:31)

As these passages and many others demonstrate, the Bible makes it very clear that one day Jesus will rightly judge all humanity based on each individual’s faith in—or rejection of—the Son of God. For a world filled with people who believe in moral relativism—and for many professing Christians who practice morality in an attempt to earn righteousness—this day will be filled with fear and trepidation. The Judge of the universe has made a judgment about salvation, echoed by the Apostle Peter in Acts 4:12: “Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.” There will be no time to debate whether the judgment is right or wrong because the ultimate Judge has decreed His justice through the Son.

Let us consider the idea of judging as it relates to believers and unbelievers. The methods are different when dealing with these two groups, but the goal is reconciliation. Unbelievers need to know Christ and be reconciled to Him, and believers need to grow in Christ and be reconciled to each other.

How Judging Relates to Unbelievers

When a Christian lovingly and graciously presents the gospel to unbelievers, a judgment is made regarding their standing with God. The Bible clearly declares that all men are sinners, have fallen short of the glory of God, and are in need of redemption from their sins (Romans 3:23). This judgment is not made from the opinion of the Christian who is presenting the gospel but rather by what the Bible clearly declares.

The claim that Christians are not to judge is often made when dealing with issues such as abortion, adultery, homosexual behavior, and same-sex marriage. When a Christian says, for example, that homosexual behavior is a sin and that same-sex marriage is wrong, he or she is often met with objections like the following:

  • “Who are you to judge two people who love each other?”
  • “Who do you think you are, telling someone who they can and cannot love? You’re a sinner, too!”
  • “Someone’s private life is none of your business. Don’t judge them.”

Some people will even quote Matthew 7:1, where Christ said during the Sermon on the Mount, “Judge not, that you be not judged.” Of course, when they quote this verse in regard to such situations, they take it out of context to support their fallacious claims. When we consider the concept of judging, especially as it relates to the Sermon on the Mount, Christ tells us to be discerning, not condemning.

There are significant logical problems with the claim that believers should not make judgments. The first becomes evident when we read the context of Matthew 7:1.

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with what judgment you judge, you will be judged; and with the measure you use, it will be measured back to you. And why do you look at the speck in your brother’s eye, but do not consider the plank in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me remove the speck from your eye’; and look, a plank is in your own eye? Hypocrite! First remove the plank from your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.” (Matthew 7:1–5)

Here, Christ is warning believers against making judgments in a hypocritical or condemning manner. That type of judging is a characteristic often associated with the Pharisees during the ministry of Jesus. Many people who quote “judge not” from Matthew 7:1 fail to notice the command to judge in Matthew 7:5, when it says, “Then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.” The point Jesus emphasizes here is to judge yourself first before you make judgments about others. (Also, notice the discernment and judgment required in Matthew 7:15–16, (20).) In the broader context, Jesus is telling believers to be discerning when it comes to false teaching and false prophets because they “look” Christian, but their goal is to lead the flock astray (Matthew 7:15–20; Luke 6:43–45).

As Christians, we should be living godly lives so that we can first concentrate on our own repentance of sin. Sanctification is a lifelong process of being transformed every day into the image of Christ. Without this, we have no place in helping another brother or sister. What Christ teaches His believers in Matthew 7 is that if we ourselves are not personally repenting of our sins, we are in no place to tell others how sinful they are acting. But the Bible does tell us to preach the gospel—and part of the gospel message is that people are sinners in need of salvation.

How Judging Relates to Fellow Believers

We often hear claims from Christians that we are not to make judgments about other believers, especially as it relates to their erroneous teachings on Genesis. Again, the Matthew 7:1 passage is used as a justification for this type of attitude. Now, the ministry of Answers in Genesis acknowledges that there are many Christian pastors and leaders who sincerely have a love for the Lord Jesus Christ. These men have led many to Christ, work diligently with much perseverance for the kingdom of God, and minister to the hurting and sick—all because they have been transformed by the finished work of Christ on the Cross and His Resurrection from the dead. However, just like the rest of us, they are fallible and can fall into error, even regarding the issue of origins.

SCRIPTURE PROVIDES MANY EXAMPLES OF HOW GOD’S PEOPLE CAN BE IN ERROR.

Scripture provides many examples of how God’s people can be in error, dating back to (and before) the kings of Israel and Judah. Out of the 39 rulers in Israel and Judah after the time of Solomon, only eight of them (1 Kings 1–2, all from Judah) tried to reverse the evil their predecessors had introduced into the kingdom. Only eight of them saw the depravity around them and tried to do something about it. However, these godly kings had failures as well. These eight kings have their histories tarnished because they failed to take down the high places (1 Kings 15:11, 14; 22:43; 2 Kings 12:2–3; 14:3–4; 15:3–4, 34–35). Upon entering Canaan, the Israelites were commanded to destroy everything, including pagan places of worship on high mountains. Rather than destroy them, the Israelites made them into additional worship centers, contrary to what they had been commanded by God. Even the godliest of people are capable of falling into error.The core message of Answers in Genesis is one of defending biblical authority and proclaiming the gospel, which brings controversy when it comes to the topic of judging. For instance, in addition to dealing with the issues above from a biblical perspective, Answers in Genesis points out that there are many Christians (including Christian leaders) who add millions of years, evolution, or both to Scripture. We expose this compromise not to make harsh judgments about the person or his spiritual walk, but to show the inconsistency (as we all can be) of a Christian leader towards Genesis—and the negative implications that it can have on the rest of Scripture.

Now, the ministry of AiG is dedicated to upholding the authority of the Bible and giving answers to point out that such compromise positions are really undermining God’s Word and its authority. When AiG does that, we are often told that we are unloving and that we should not be making judgments about others by pointing out errors in their teaching regarding Genesis.

Some people take offense and say that as believers, we should focus on loving others and not be divisive. We are, however, divisive if we do not correct error. Are we working toward the “unity of the faith” (Ephesians 4:13), or are we compromising God’s Word by allowing for the world’s “wisdom”? Remember, as believers we are all part of “one faith” (Ephesians 4:5). We must establish our foundation in the truth of God’s Word and not our own philosophies, making God the authority over our life. Having the right foundation will help us to know the difference between truth and lies as well as right and wrong. Paul explained the need for truth and the divisive nature of lies in the following passage:

That we should no longer be children, tossed to and fro and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, in the cunning craftiness of deceitful plotting, but, speaking the truth in love, may grow up in all things into Him who is the head—Christ—from whom the whole body, joined and knit together by what every joint supplies, according to the effective working by which every part does its share, causes growth of the body for the edifying of itself in love. (Ephesians 4:14–16)

Are we being loving if we allow our fellow brethren to remain in error and even deceive others? Of course not. Loving others requires that we graciously correct them when they fall into error (Matthew 18; 1 Corinthians 1:11; Galatians 6:1). Those who err do not necessarily know they are in error; they are possibly  deceived or ignorant. So we gently and carefully correct the error in regard to teaching, no matter what the situation. After all, this is one of the responsibilities of the church: to teach sound doctrine and correct erroneous teaching (2 Timothy 2:25, 3:16; Titus 2:1). For example, we have to use discernment (judging between right and wrong) if we are to obey verses like 1 Corinthians 5:11–13; 6:4;2 Thessalonians 3:6; 1 Timothy 6:20; and Titus 3:9, just to name a few.

We need to be careful in this approach, however, as we are all fallible human beings who can make mistakes in judgment. We should find out the whole story and not base our judgment on appearances. Jesus stated, “Do not judge according to appearance, but judge with righteous judgment” (John 7:24). Notice the Lord’s command to judge. But before we make that judgment, we must make sure we are judging righteously from God’s Word and not relying on our own opinion. Sometimes hard judgment calls must be made, as not everything is “black and white,” which is why it is so important to know and apply the truth of Scripture.

It’s also important when discussing such difficult issues  to explain, as a Christian, why we take the stand we do. For instance, when asked about same-sex marriage, we can explain that Christians should build their thinking on the Bible, and therefore we should go to God’s Word to see what He clearly instructs us. Then we use His Word to make a judgment about the issue. We can also explain that if someone does not believe that God’s Word is the foundation for their worldview, then we can understand why they disagree. So, we have two different starting points (or foundations), and thus two different worldviews that conflict and therefore make judgments of each other. But in every instance, we must stress that all sin can be forgiven in the work of Christ on the Cross.

Realistically, people make judgments all the time. Now, if one person commits murder, should a Christian look at that action and say, “That was wrong because God’s Word says not to murder,” or should he say, “I’m not supposed to make a judgment”? And what if someone steals from you? Would you say, “That was wrong because God’s Word says not to steal,” or would you say, “I’m not supposed to make a judgment”? Furthermore, when someone tells us that we need to stop judging others, they have actually just judged us. So they are guilty of doing the very thing they tell us not to do.

We make judgments on various teachings and ideas every day, including our own. The biblical mentality of making judgments applies to any situation where a person is openly committing an error against God and His Word—whether that person is living in sin, such as adultery or homosexual behavior, or compromising God’s Word and causing others to stumble and doubt His Word. We even make judgments of our children’s actions as we work to help them see their sinful condition before God, and point them to the gospel, in order that they might be saved and grow in obedience to God and His Word.

The key  is making righteous judgments so that we can point people to the gospel. God’s Word gives us a clear standard to abide by, and the Holy Spirit guides us in what is right, wrong, true, and false. In order to make judgments righteously, we should be striving to live righteously and allowing the Word of God to be our foundation in every area of our thinking.

Conclusion: Biblical Perspective of “Judge Not”

Those people who call for tolerance and quote “judge not” out of context are not using sound thinking. Their call for tolerance is impossible because as Christians, we are called to judge righteously, and judging between right and wrong is something we do every day—and it should be a part of biblical discernment in every believer’s thinking. But it is God’s Word that makes the judgment on morality and truth, not our own opinions or theories.

What’s the purpose of judging error in a biblical manner? The church is to be built on the foundation of Christ and the authority of His Word (Ephesians 2:20)—and that means believers should examine their own lives regularly and also lovingly challenge Christian brothers and sisters who are in error or commit sin. To do this, believers must be bold for Christ, but they also have to be humble, loving, and kind. We encourage you to keep these things in mind as you strive daily to maintain unity in the truth of Christ (John 17:20–26).

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I’m relaxed, and that’s not good.

Lol…when I asked for suggestions in my last post, I was not prepared to have it liked at all, I was expecting comments more than anything else… 🙂 Anyways, moving on.

I am sure many of you have heard of the persecutions happening to the Christians, Yazidis, and other minorities in northern Iraq.  The atrocities committed are brutally savage and makes you wonder whether this ISIS militants are even human.

Here are a few news articles that I found with a quick search:

Hereherehere, and here(news video+written article).

It is times like this that should make us stop and reflect on our own walk with God.  In the country that I believe many of you live in, you are able to pull out the Bible, while on the street, and not get a potential death threat.  You are able to say out loud and in public that you attend this so and so church and not return home to find your house burned down.

Yet, do we even bother to spend at least a portion each day in opening up that Bible that we own and studying it diligently?  While in other places of the world, a person’s head can be lopped off for the crime of owning a Bible.

Do we just go to church for every service and act solely as a benchwarmer?  While in other places of the world, families are torn apart and destroyed for the crime of gathering as a body of believers to worship God.

It is very easy for us to get used to having freedoms like this, and I am sure we have all been guilty of taking these freedoms for granted.  I have.  In fact, if we stopped to think about it, Satan has used the method of infiltration rather than persecution in the countries with religious freedom.

“…for he [Satan] is a liar, and the father of it.” and the devil knows how to use various ways – especially the internet – to distract and sway us in our fellowship with God.  The social media is just out there waving their banner in our faces, getting our attentions.

How much better would the world be if we did as this popular saying states:

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Suggestions. anyone?

Hey, y’all! This is just a post to let all of you know that I am open to any suggestion on what I should write on next. Please be warned that I will screen through everything heavily, and if I feel like it’s a subject that isn’t appropriate, it will not be written on.

So, just comment on this post, or on the About page! I still have some things that have already be written, but would like to know what you, as the readers, are interested in.

“I kissed a girl, and I liked it…”

Right now, homosexual marriage and homosexual rights are hot topics. It has been around for a very, very long time and now has been given more leeway. As a Christian, this scares me. This is something that has brought the whole world to a whole new, higher level of immorality and sin.

But, what is so bad about marrying a same sex partner and having couple rights? It’s an easy question to answer from a Christian perspective – the Bible says it is wrong. There.

Leviticus 18:22 “Thou shalt not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is abomination.”

Leviticus 20:13 “If a man also lie with mankind, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination: they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them.”

Romans 1: 26-27 “(26) For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature: (27) And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly, and receiving in themselves that recompence of their error which was meet. (28) And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient;”

Then for those who aren’t Christians, allow me to go into more details – It is not natural.

No one is born a homosexual. There is no gene that says, “Hey, this individual is gonna be a homosexual!”  Just like no one is born with a gene that says, “This dude is going to be a paedophile, a rapist, a murderer, a vegan, a Christian, a Buddhist, etc…”

What happens is that a person chooses to be a lesbian/gay. Homosexuality is a preference, a perversion of nature.  Just as bestiality is.

And the homosexuals are screaming for rights. Please, do not bring up that picture of those African-Americans having protests for civil rights. That is a completely different thing – they wanted to be treated as human beings, and rightfully so. What homosexuals want is to make their life easier so that they can be recognised as a couple, to buy property, insurance, and what a normal heterosexual couple would have.

If various states or countries were to allow this, then why not we also make child marriages easier too? And by child, I mean twelve and younger, as is relatively common in Middle East? Why not make it legal for a human to marry a goat? Why not remove all the laws that prohibit necrophilia? Why not allow a father to divorce his wife and then marry his own daughter?

I may seem harsh, comparing homosexuality to all the rest of what seems like a worse offense. But, there is no such thing as a “worser” offense in God’s eyes. If you sin, it means you have sinned. That’s that, end of discussion.

The reason why the LGBT movement have to be so aggressive and rough is mainly this – they can only recruit they cannot reproduce. Can a woman and another woman, after having sex, produce a baby? What about a man and another man, can they make a baby and give birth? No.

Just gather up all the LGBTs and stick them on an island. Visit them about a hundred years later and the population would have decreased drastically. Sure, some of the couples might have shared their spouses with the opposite sex couples so that they can have children. But, there is no guarantee that the child that is born would be a homosexual. Just as how, in this world where the majority of the population is straight, they still manage to raise children who turn out to be gay.

So, yes, I may sound harsh. But, sin is not something to be taken lightly, and I will not take the subject of homosexuality lightly.

Let What Go?!

I am sure that almost everywhere you go, you can hear either Idina Menzel or Demi Lovato screaming the lyrics to “Let It Go” at the top of their lungs. Just recently, when I was on the bus, I heard a three year boy singing the very same song. It is actually quite a catchy song that you either like at once, or it gradually grows on you.
Now, I do not have a problem when this song was used in the context of the movie, although, I would still find it a bit extreme for my taste. Anyways, if you were to really study the lyrics and absorb the words, it is actually a very rebellious song. Let’s take a look:
“Don’t let them in,
don’t let them see
Be the good girl you always have to be
Conceal, don’t feel,
don’t let them know
Well now they know
Let it go, let it go
Can’t hold it back anymore…”
I have a question, it says “Be the good girl you always have to be/Conceal don’t feel…” Conceal what? Is it the fact that on the outside a person has always been obedient, but on the inside, the heart is actually a rebel, so the person now shouldn’t conceal the fact?

Another one:
“Let it go, let it go
Turn away and slam the door
I don’t care
what they’re going to say
Let the storm rage on.
The cold never bothered me anyway…”
So, now it says “Let it go!!!!” Question is, let what go? The good girl? Oh, oh, (here, I clap like an excited kid at Christmas) and this is my favorite, “Turn away and slam the door/I don’t care/what they’re going to say…” Can you imagine your kid – if you have one – say, or even sing, this to you? Ouch, I can only assume how mad the parent would get.

Continuing:
“It’s time to see what I can do
To test the limits and break through
No right, no wrong, no rules for me,
I’m free!”
Mm-hmmm, I can just imagine the meth addict or the drunk singing this to himself, to “test the limits” of how much drugs or booze he can take at one go, to “break through.” But, seriously, the lyrics here are especially eye-brow raising, “No right, no wrong, no rules for me…” Imagine a world like that. If there were no right or wrong, then I guarantee you that this world would kill itself. That’s what Stalin, Hitler, or other dictators thought, that there were no rules for them. However, you can read about the horrors that they committed.

Okay, here, I am more of just making fun of the lyrics:
“…the past is in the past…” Yes, that is true, BUT, the past will come back and haunt you. Everything you do has consequences. Think before acting.

Now, why am I making such an almost uncalled for and harsh comment on this? Because, think of who this is affecting! The children. Children are the future. Joseph Goebbels once said, “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” And, he definitely knew what he was talking about, since he himself did this. If the children were to grow up tuned in to what this song teaches, they will believe this lie.

It Bites and Poisons

I abruptly yanked my hand back when I accidentally touched the hot kettle. I quickly stuck my finger under the cold running water and smiled. Now, this might seem weird, I just burned my hand, and yet, I am smiling. The usual protocol would be to yell, cry, or be shocked quiet. And, no, I am not a sadist. Here’s the reason why – I am glad that I still have my right hand. The pain is just a reminder that I could have lost this arm.

I am a biology teacher and an avid photographer. Combine this two qualities, add a nice forest – by my house – to the mix, and you get a person that regularly takes hikes in the wooded area.

On that fateful day, I had taken my camera out and went towards the forest, in hopes of spotting this flower that I had spotted in one of my earlier hikes. I wanted to see if it were not fully bloomed.

I tramped towards the spot, brushing aside overhanging branches, preventing them from slapping me, and ferns that threatened to sweep my face. At last, I came to my destination.

The flower was gorgeous! It measured about ten centimeters from the furthest opposite end of each petal. It had a bluish hue to it, almost going into a violet color, but not quite. Even from a few feet away from it, I could smell its wonderful, flowery scent wafting towards me.

I walked forward and reached out my hand to push aside the small bush that was blocking part of the flower. That’s when the snake decided to bite. I gasped aloud and abruptly pulled back my hand and blindly shuffled backwards, as far as I could from the snake. All the while, trying to take in as much descriptive information of the snake.

I looked down at my right hand and saw the tell-tale snake bite marks. It was starting to swell. The color was slowly turning towards an angry red. I was starting to feel nauseated. I realized with dismay that I had left my phone and car keys at home.

But, first things first, I had to stop the venom from spreading, especially since I was going to be walking. I quickly undid my belt, tied it around my hand – slightly above the wound – and tightened it as tight as I dared. I then set off to my house.

By the time I reached the house, my hand felt like I had dunked it into a cauldron of boiling oil; I was staring to gasp for breath, and my vision was starting to get blurry. I snatched up my keys and phone. I fumbled a bit with the phone before I managed to dial the local clinic near my house.

“Hello, Florida State Clinic, how may I help you?” a female voice answered.

“I just got bitten by a snake. I am on my way to the clinic now. I am quite sure that it was a copperhead. It was about seventy centimeters in length, of a reddish-brown, coppery color, plump.” I blurted as I started pulling out of my drive way. I know, it was probably hazardous to drive and talk on the phone – even more so when you have just have been bitten by a snake. However, all these seems trivial when you start hyperventilating, wondering if every breath you take would be your last.

“All right. We will have the anti-venom ready for you, and a medic team present as soon as you arrive.”

Thank God that the roads were fairly empty. I only encountered two cars on my way to the clinic. I saw the sign for the clinic and swerved into the drive way. The medic team was present and as soon as I tumbled out of the car, they hurried over.

They lifted me up to the gurney, but not before I lurched to the side and vomited. When I lay back down, I felt the gurney being pushed forward, and then I lost all consciousness.

Needless to say, I made it back to good health. The doctor had been mildly surprised that the poison hadn’t taken my arm. He did pointedly say that it was probably because of the quick actions that I took.

I merely smiled for I knew that it was not by my strength. When I went back home, I cautiously went back to the flower. This time, I brought my baseball bat and a long pole to push aside that same bush which the snake had been hiding in. The coast was clear.

Finally, I managed to take the photos of the flower that started it all.

 

AN: I have never been bitten by a snake, never had any experience with handling snakes. Therefore, I do not have any firsthand experience with this kind of scenarios. This original short story is just based on the first aid that I have learned, and from research regarding poisonous snakes. For those with experience, please feel free to comment on any mistakes!

To Live, To Laugh, To Love

The number of Filipinos in the church I attend has greatly increased over the years. And, with it, has my interactions with this ethnic group also increased. Here’s what I have learnt about most Filipinos. They are a fun-loving bunch of people – people whom you would want to invite to your party.

It is so easy to be around them. I am, by nature, quite an extroverted and loud person. But, in this Chinese culture in Singapore, you can’t really act like that in a group setting. Sure, me and my Chinese pals do laugh and stuff, but it has to be a toned down version – if not, weird stares would come your way. Whereas, with the Filipinos, no one cares if you find something funny and you start laughing uncontrollably and kinda loudly, in fact, they would probably even join you.

For example, a few years back, we had invited quite a few of the Chinese families in the church come over for a Christmas dinner. Everything went quite well, we chit chatted and held conversations. But, I stopped to observe these guests for a while. A number of them were either seated quietly and staring into space, or they were involved with their electronic gadgets. Unless you made the effort to talk to them, or make the guests talk to each other, they would continue to be like that for quite some time.

Then, during another time, we had invited the Filipinos, and only them, for a meal at my house. Boy, was that a blast. Once they had put down their food, they immediately started talking and laughing with each other. By the time the fellowship “officially” started, the entire house was filled with the happy sounds of laughter and a mix of the Tagalog and English language. Of course, there were a few that did take out their phones, iPads, and stuff, but it was mostly to take hilarious selfies and random pictures.

If you were to ask me which party I enjoyed the most, it would be the one with the Filipinos.

However, I do not mean to say that being a serious person is a bad thing. There are times when you certainly have to be serious. But, I do enjoy the moments when I can just let my hair loose and enjoy the little humorous moments that God puts into my life. To live, to laugh, to love.